Vintage Books & Anchor Books

From Classic to Contemporary—The Best Books in Paperback.
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“Nobody who works hard should be poor in America.” —from “The Working Poor: Invisible in America” By David K. Shipler
Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/AVdRl

“Nobody who works hard should be poor in America.”
—from “The Working Poor: Invisible in America” By David K. Shipler

Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/AVdRl

"At a Koch Foods poultry plant in Tennessee, the managers were so intent on keeping the line running all out that Antonia Lopez Paz and the other workers who carved off chicken tenders were ordered not to go to the bathroom except during their lunch and coffee breaks. When one desperate woman asked permission to go, her supervisor took off his hard hat and said, “You can go to the bathroom in this.” Some women ended up soiling themselves."—from “The Big Squeeze: Tough Times for the American Worker” By Steven Greenhouse. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/AVdFF

"At a Koch Foods poultry plant in Tennessee, the managers were so intent on keeping the line running all out that Antonia Lopez Paz and the other workers who carved off chicken tenders were ordered not to go to the bathroom except during their lunch and coffee breaks. When one desperate woman asked permission to go, her supervisor took off his hard hat and said, “You can go to the bathroom in this.” Some women ended up soiling themselves."
—from “The Big Squeeze: Tough Times for the American Worker” By Steven Greenhouse. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/AVdFF

"Culture does not make people. People make culture. If it is true that the full humanity of women is not our culture, then we can and must make it our culture."— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “We Should All Be Feminists”

"Culture does not make people. People make culture. If it is true that the full humanity of women is not our culture, then we can and must make it our culture."
— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “We Should All Be Feminists”

"The door might not be opened to a woman again for a long, long time, and I had a kind of duty to other women to walk in and sit down on the chair that was offered, and so establish the right of others long hence and far distant in geography to sit in the high seats."— Frances Perkins, The first female U.S. Secretary of Labor

"The door might not be opened to a woman again for a long, long time, and I had a kind of duty to other women to walk in and sit down on the chair that was offered, and so establish the right of others long hence and far distant in geography to sit in the high seats."
— Frances Perkins, The first female U.S. Secretary of Labor

"Every age creates its own Shakespeare."
—from Shakespeare After All by Marjorie Garber

On this day in 1933, Gertrude Stein published The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, her account of her salon life as seen through the devoted eyes of her companion. This ventriloquism allowed her to be Boswell to her own Johnson, and enshrine such Steinisms as “It was then that Gertrude Stein said, Hemingway, remarks are not literature.”

“I always say that you cannot tell what a picture really is or what an object really is until you dust it every day and you cannot tell what a book is until you type it or proof-read it. It then does something to you that only reading it never can do.”
― Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas

More here: http://ow.ly/AWj0Z

In all history there is no war which was not hatched by the governments, the governments alone, independent of the interests of the people, to whom war is always pernicious even when successful.
from “Christianity and Patriotism” (1895) by Leo Tolstoy
The pen is the tongue of the soul; as are the thoughts engendered there, so will be the things written.
from DON QUIXOTE, Part II (1615), by Miguel de Cervantes
"Although Sammy Davis, Jr., was descended from the dangers of the Negro plantation-this one located in rural North Carolina-it was the Cuban blood that would confuse him for a lifetime. Family members on the Cuban side would refer to it as "this Cuban thing." They meant the currency implied in a particular shade of skin color. And, linked to that, they meant the way love and resentment and distance and abandonment can infect any family, the way it could zoom in and out of mothers and sons and daughters, like a storm whooshing sideways on a horizontal force of its own, missing no one. So it was with his own family.” —from “In Black and White: The Life of Sammy Davis Junior” By Wil Haygood

"Although Sammy Davis, Jr., was descended from the dangers of the Negro plantation-this one located in rural North Carolina-it was the Cuban blood that would confuse him for a lifetime. Family members on the Cuban side would refer to it as "this Cuban thing." They meant the currency implied in a particular shade of skin color. And, linked to that, they meant the way love and resentment and distance and abandonment can infect any family, the way it could zoom in and out of mothers and sons and daughters, like a storm whooshing sideways on a horizontal force of its own, missing no one. So it was with his own family.”
—from “In Black and White: The Life of Sammy Davis Junior” By Wil Haygood